banji-realness:

sandyfarquhar:

bemusedlybespectacled:

postatomichorror:

fishysciencevoldemort:

wow, look at that hot greaser I mean damn son- 
wait. waaaait. Is that Leonard Nimoy? 
You be your sweet ass that’s Leonard Nimoy
(gif credit)

Spock without a cause.

please keep in mind that this is what spock looks like to vulcans

wtf

Oh

tell me again at bedtime

10,566 notes

!!!!!!!!!!

!!!!!!!!!!

(Source: glasscatfigurine, via banji-realness)

1,852 notes

thedoppelganger:

Right eye from a Greek statue, 500–100 BC, marble, obsidian, glass, copper

thedoppelganger:

Right eye from a Greek statue, 500–100 BC, marble, obsidian, glass, copper

(via bloodhole)

14,584 notes

Modern art was CIA 'weapon'

The CIA also backed Iowa and creative writing MFA programs in general.

This article kind of buries and doesn’t go into the reasons why they backed abstract expressionism specifically - they quote a former CIA asshole and probably current asshole saying

It was recognised that Abstract Expression- ism was the kind of art that made Socialist Realism look even more stylised and more rigid and confined than it was. And that relationship was exploited in some of the exhibitions.

but socialist realism was not the only politically left “representational” art going at the time - the article mentions Rockefeller as a big booster of abstract expressionism; it doesn’t mention that he started doing this after he saw the Diego Rivera fresco he commissioned, freaked out, and destroyed it

basically - they saw a.e’ism happening and were like, oh, perfect, no opportunity for overt political statements here, and threw a lot of money at it.

(Source: blog-cdaleyoung, via springbishop)

37 notes

imaginaryprisons:

sojourn-of-sound:

Rage Against The Machine - “Killing In The Name” (elevator jazz version)

Someone took Rage Against The Machine’s classic and made it sound way less angry and way more jazzy. It’s pure, unbridled genius.

Second most disturbing cover I ever heard.

good for what ails you

35 notes

maroonedoffvesta:

OR.: Have you heard what the dream was? Can you tell it right?
CH.: She dreamt she gave birth to a snake—that is her own account.
OR.: What followed? How does the story end?
CH.: She swaddled it and laid it to rest like a little child.
OR.: What food did it crave, the new-born venomous brute?
CH.: In her dream she offered her breast.
OR.: Surely her nipple was wounded by the loathsome thing?
CH.: Yes; with the milk it drew forth clots of blood. [from Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers]

Orestes is very plainly prompting, he is not asking, and the function of a line like “What food did it crave…”, cast in question form, is to coax into the open an aspect of Clytemnestra’s dream which the dramatist wants mentioned… [T]he information that emerges serves the unfolding tale and not the questioner’s ignorance.

—John Jones, On Aristotle and Greek Tragedy

life-of-planet-earth:

Vine Snake

come on now

life-of-planet-earth:

Vine Snake

come on now

(via specks-of-infinity)

157,476 notes

danskjavlarna:

For Gary Barwin.  From The Invasion of the Crimea by Alexander William Kinglake, 1863.

danskjavlarna:

For Gary Barwin.  From The Invasion of the Crimea by Alexander William Kinglake, 1863.

22 notes